The CAP Awards 2016: Winners!

cap-trophiesThe inaugural CAP Awards

A very important event in Irish independent publishing took place on Tuesday last, 25 October 2016. That was the evening bestselling author, Hazel Gaynor, cut the ribbon for the inaugural CAP Awards (Carousel Aware Prize for Independent Authors) at a gala evening in the Teachers’ Club, Parnell Square in Dublin.

Best Junior Book Award: Aisli Madden with Carolann Copland

Best Junior Book Award: Aislí Madden with Carolann Copland

The brainchild of indie author and owner of Carousel Creates Writers’ Centre, Carolann Copland, the CAP Awards were founded to acknowledge the achievement of indie authors in Ireland and to showcase the cream of Irish independently-published books across a wide range of categories: short stories, children’s books, Young Adult books, novels and non-fiction.

Kevin Doyle: Winner, Best Short Story Anthology with Hazel Gaynor and Gerry O'Brien

Best Short Story Anthology Award: Kevin Doyle, with Hazel Gaynor and Gerry O’Brien of Aware

The standard of the shortlisted authors alone indicates how far Irish indie publishing has come in the past few years and I don’t think any of us present envied the judges – including award-winning authors  Jax Miller, Louise Phillips and Claire Hennessy, and Books Ireland editor, Tony Canavan – their task of choosing a winner from amongst the worthy contenders in each category.

2016 Winners

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CAP Award Winners 2016, Aislí Madden, Kevin Doyle and Lorna Sixsmith, with Carolann Copland of Carousel Creates Writers’ Centre and Gerry O’Brien of Aware

But choices were made and congratulations to the five winners of the CAP Awards for 2016:

Best Short Story Anthology:  Do You Like Oranges? by Kevin Doyle
Best Junior Book: Zenji & the Muzzy Bug by Aislí Madden
Best Young Adult Book: Death’s New Lease On Life by Brendan O’Connell
Best Novel:  Her Secret Rose by Orna Ross
Best Non-Fiction: How to be a Perfect Farm Wife by Lorna Sixsmith

Why the CAP Awards are winners for Irish indie publishing

The importance of the CAP Awards to the Irish writing and publishing industry was emphasised by Young Adult judge, Claire Hennessy:

CAP Award for Best YA Book, Anne O'Leary (for author Brendan O'Connell) with Claire Hennessy and Gerry O'Brien

CAP Award for Best YA Book, Anne O’Leary, Books Ireland, (for author Brendan O’Connell) with Claire Hennessy and Gerry O’Brien

“… I do think it’s vital that we have the opportunity to recognise quality work that doesn’t fit into neat boxes; that doesn’t seem like a viable large-scale ‘business’ decision, but that nevertheless, through the vision and hard work and investment of an individual author, is engaging and brilliant and worthy of wider attention. The difficulty for readers of self-published work is the lack of curation, not just from publishers, but also in terms of how tricky it is to get reviews, etc. Awards like this are a way of curating and identifying the brilliant self-published books out there …”

Promoting Indie excellence

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Best Novel Award, Lorna Sixsmith (for author Orna Ross) with Jax Miller and Gerry O’Brien

The calibre of all the books on the CAP Awards shortlists make it clear that many Irish indie authors have taken on board and successfully addressed the issue of quality in their work. To paraphrase Laurence O’Bryan, founder of The Dublin Writers’ Conference, the days of so-called ‘vanity publishing’ are over and the era of independent authors who offer readers a high-quality, diverse and exciting range of individual voices and experiences has arrived.

And, if you’ll pardon the pun, the CAP Awards has one more feather in its … ahem … CAP for winning authors. Thanks to fantastic sponsorship of the Awards by Dubray Books and Easons, the CAP Awards winners will see their books on sale in two of Ireland’s leading bookstores. Who knows, maybe there’ll be an Indie Author section in every bookstore in Ireland soon?

Lorna Sixsmith: Winner Best Non-Fiction with Tony Canvan of Books Ireland

Best Non-Fiction Award: Lorna Sixsmith, with Tony Canavan of Books Ireland

In the meantime, the Carousel Aware Prize for Independent Authors will continue to acknowledge and promote excellence in Irish independent publishing and the Committee is already gearing up for 2017. Details of next year’s Awards will be published on the CAP Awards website.

And don’t forget: all proceeds from the Awards go to mental health charity, Aware, which provides vital support and assistance to individuals and their families coping with mental health issues in today’s complicated and complex world. It’s a win-win for all involved!

Thanks to Adrian Taheny and the CAP Awards for the photographs.

The CAP Awards 2016: full Shortlists and Winners

Congratulations to all those shortlisted and to the five winners! 🙂 🙂 🙂

BEST JUNIOR BOOK

Fiona Buckley –  Better than Gold
Dolores Keaveney  – The Scary Spider
Aislí Madden – Zenji & the Muzzy Bug (Winner)
SP McArdle –  The Red-Letter Day
Caroline Twomey  – The Dream Catcher

BEST YOUNG ADULT BOOK

Siobhán Davis – Saven: Deception
Drew Darkwood – Link
Brian Kirk  – The Rising Son
Alan Murphy – Prometheus Unplugged!
Brendan O’Connell – Death’s New Lease On Life (Winner)

BEST SHORT STORY ANTHOLOGY

Kathryn Crowley  – Sweaters and Small Stuff
Kevin Doyle – Do You Like Oranges? (Winner)
Annmarie Miles – The Long & The Short of it

BEST NOVEL

Thomas Paul Burgess – White Church, Black Mountain
James Lawless – American Doll
Pam Lecky – The Bowes Inheritance
Neil Rochford – The Blue Ridge Project
Orna Ross – Her Secret Rose (Winner)

BEST NON-FICTION

Corina Duyn – Into The Light
Sharyn Hayden – I Forgot to Take My Pill
Lorna Sixsmith – How to be a Perfect Farm Wife (Winner)
Michael Thurlow – The Marley Man
Fiona Van Dokkum – From the Inside: Raising, teaching and loving an autistic child

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A Question of Craft

 

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I hope you enjoyed the two articles in the last post.

It’s good to see Sinead Gleeson’s article advocating the ‘shove it in the drawer’ approach to resting manuscripts before editing or re-drafting, but you heard it from Book Nanny first – check out ‘Are we there yet? Knowing when to edit’ here.

Of course, it’s all part of the craft of writing, which, incidentally, was the main topic of discussion recently at a talk given by my colleague, Carolann Copland, author and facilitator at Carousel Creates Writers Retreat, at the Hays Festival Kells last month.

MH900280567Carolann was discussing the old ‘nature versus nurture’ argument when applied to writers and their writing. Is writing a gift or a skill? Can we be taught to write well or does it come naturally? And what part does skill or craft play in the process of writing? Fortunately for those of us who couldn’t get to Kells, we can read Carolann’s blog post on the subject here, and, as you will see, your own Book Nanny gets to put her tuppence worth into the mix.

Editing can help your manuscript shine, so before you send your book or story out into the world, it is well worth learning a few self-editing skills and hiring a professional editor to help you turn your rough diamond into a sparkling gem.